age-friendly, Lifelong Learning, Partners, transportation

CarFit is Returning to Saskatoon – Learn how to improve your safety behind the wheel

New Photo wtih SSOT CAOT CarFit LogoCarFit will be in Saskatoon on Saturday, September 15, 2018 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the Affinity Credit Union Campus, 902 7th Avenue North.

At a CarFit clinic, a team of trained CarFit technicians will work one-on-one with the driver demonstrating how to properly adjust mirrors, seat, steering wheel, head restraint plus more tips to help stay safe behind the wheel.

The CarFit program recognizes that older drivers are often the safest drivers. They are more likely to wear their seatbelts, less likely to speed, plus less likely to drive impaired. However, as drivers mature, age-related changes in vision, flexibility, strength, and range of motion can make drivers less comfortable and reduce their control behind the wheel. CarFit provides education and tools to assist mature drivers in understanding and applying the built-in safety features of their vehicle.

At the end of the 12-point checklist, occupational therapists can help with individual needs and provide information about local resources to help with driver safety.


Book your appointment today for your FREE 20-minute checkup. Receive a bonus gift for participating in the clinic. Register by contacting Lona Gervais at 306.310.6222 ext. 0909 or lona.gervais@caask.ca.


Here’s what one of the drivers from the clinic in North Battleford had to say about his experience:

“This was my first CarFit, and I was impressed to see how well organized and efficient the course really was. From a walk around circle-check, to proper mirror positioning, I learned a thing or two about the orientation of my vehicle. CarFit isn’t only meant for an older age group, there were things I learned I didn’t know until going through the steps, and finding my safest fit!”
– Kevin Dunn, 2018 Saskatchewanderer

As a long-time safety advocate for motorists of all ages, CAA Saskatchewan is proud to host CarFit clinics in partnership with the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists and the Saskatchewan Society of Occupational Therapists. Thank you to the Saskatoon Council on Aging for their sponsorship of the September 15 clinic. For more information, visit caask.ca/carfit.

Advertisements
age-friendly, Classes, Lifelong Learning, Programming

Fall 2018 Classes & Programs

All classes held at SCOA ~ 2020 College Drive. Phone 306-652-2255 to register.
Class fees must be paid in advance.

Older Adults Life Skills Workshop
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 1, 2018

Service Canada presentation on a variety of programs and service offerings of interest to older adults including My Service Canada Account, Canada Pension Plan Retirement and Survivor Benefits, Old Age Security, Allowance and Allowance for Survivor Benefits, Employment Insurance Compassionate Care and Family Caregiver Benefits, Canadian Retirement Income Calculator, and much more! For information on CPP/OAS call Service Canada at 1 800 O-Canada (1-800-622-6232) or visit online at www.canada.ca.

Community Legal Assistance Services for Saskatoon Inner City Inc. (CLASSIC) presentation on Powers of Attorney, Health Care Directives, and Wills. A law student will provide legal information on the importance of each document, their effect, and some factors that should be considered for each type of document. The law student can provide legal information only and will not be able to provide legal advice.

Please note that the registration fee is charged solely by SCOA as a registration fee. Information on Government of Canada services and Classic is free.

$10 Registration Fee (snacks and coffee provided) To register call SCOA at 306-652-2255.


Explosive Ink on Tile 

inkontile
Have an explosive time creating colourfully inked 6×6 ceramic tiles for your home or for the holiday season. There is no skill required – all supplies included. You will take home 4 amazing tiles and 2 stands for display. You won’t want to miss this fantastic fun-filled opportunity to add some vibrant colour into your life or to give a great gift to someone special.

Date:   October 22, 2018        (3hrs)  1pm-4pm        Cost:   $50 per class

 

Watercolour Saskatoon Berry Card 

saskatoonberrycard
Paint plump berries on a branch against an abstract background, on watercolour paper. Your picture will be greeting card size, perfect to send to a special friend, Cecilia will walk you through the process – all supplies included.

Date:   September 24, 2018    (3hrs)  1 pm-4 pm        Cost:   $50 per class

 

 


d6eaef91aae6efa3a9643a12e5b2a7cc-pretty-birds-beautiful-birdsAn Introduction to Birding

This course will help you get started in birding.  To develop identification skills, you will learn how to use field marks, song, behavior and habitat in identifying birds.  We review binoculars, field guides and smartphone apps that will enhance your birding experience and discuss the opportunities that abound in Saskatoon to make birding  an enjoyable activity for you

No experience or equipment is required, but if you have a bird field guide please bring it with you.  The 3rd session will be held outdoors at a city park.

Dates: Tuesdays, September 4, 11 & 18 (2hrs)        2:00 – 4:00 

Cost:   $30


iphone-71 Apple Technology Classes 

Beginner one-on-one Apple classes on Friday afternoons.  Become more confident using your Apple iPad or iPhone. Register now for 2 classes of 1.5 hrs (3 hrs) which includes a take home manual.

Date: Friday afternoons

Cost:    $40

IOS 12 Apple operating system and Iphone/Ipad photography Class

 Mystified with the Apple system update (IOS 12)? Having troubles with photos stored on the “Cloud”? Small group class sessions with 5 people per class – register early.

Date:    November 6th New IOS 12 Apple update (1.5 hrs) 1:30 – 3:00

November 20   Photography/cloud storage (1.5 hrs) 1:30 – 3:00

Cost: $15 per class


downloadTech Buddy 

(Any type of technology device, )

One-on-one beginner technology classes with students from local high schools.

Program to run in the Fall of 2018; a waiting list will be kept.

Cost:    $10 (Fee to cover administration costs)

age-friendly, Partners, transportation

Experience Transit 2018

Saskatoon Transit is exploring new ways in which to promote sustainable alternatives to car use and to support friendly forms of transportation such as walking, cycling, ride sharing, and public transit. There is huge potential in this area for older adults, new Canadians, students, and any individuals new to transit to become more active in multi-modal transportation. Saskatoon Transit is leading this kind of change. This summer there will be several opportunities for you to test drive transit and Experience Transit as a 1st or 2nd time rider.

People new to transit are faced with challenges as they consider a change in their mode of transportation. These may include: having a support system to find a new way of being independent and mobile, understanding bus routes, fears and anxiety, and adapting to a new mode of travel. Experience Transit is a first step – positive experience that will help you overcome these initial challenges of travelling on transit.

Who can benefit from this travel training experience

  • Older adults and their families
  • Those already using transit but lacking confidence or having some anxiety about transit
  • Those with a physical and/or cognitive disability
  • Those with a mobility aide (ie: walker, wheelchair)
  • Those who would like to learn about public transit but who are still capable of driving
  • Those who are new to Saskatoon or have never tried transit before
  • Those who have English as a second language

Details about Experience Saskatoon Transit

  • In partnership with different Saskatoon community organizations, Saskatoon Transit will be offering 2 hour Experience Transit sessions this summer
  • In this 2 hour travel training session you will be introduced to Saskatoon Transit staff, learn about bus fares, how to board and disembark a bus, travel on a transit route, and participate in a lively “Transit 101” discussion. Each session is limited to 6 persons per group and availability is on a first-come basis. The size of each group, duration of session and start/end times may vary.
  • Available Dates & Time:

Wed., June 20, 2018 (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)                Thurs. June 21, 2018          (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)

Wed., July 18, 2018  (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)                Thurs., July 19, 2018                (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)

Wed., Aug. 15, 2018  (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)                Thurs., Aug. 16, 2018                (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) 

Wed., Sept. 19, 2018               (10:00 pm – 12:00 pm)                Thurs., Sept. 20, 2018                (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)

To request an application form to register a spot for yourself or a group (4-6) for one of these dates, or for more information about Experience Transit, please contact one of the following:

Cory Shrigley                                                           

Customer Support & Engagement Manager                                 Customer Service Center

Saskatoon Transit                                                                           Saskatoon Transit

Tel. 306.975.2990  cell 306.380.7100                                            Tel. 306.975.3100

Email: cory.shrigley@saskatoon.ca                                                Email: transit.services@saskatoon.ca

 

 

 

 

age-friendly

Age-Friendly Dimension #5 Respect and Social Inclusion.

Every person deserves to be treated with dignity and respect.

The older generation has a wealth of experience and wisdom to share as they stay connected with their world. However, the opportunity to have their stories heard and be a positive influence with family and friends and in the community can be compromised as we age.

One of the biggest challenges facing the older generation is loneliness and isolation. Some of us are fortunate to remain connected with those closest to us and manage to keep engaged in purposeful activities. For others, as conditions of aging become more prevalent, isolation may increase as the ability to access the outside world decreases.

If we are the older adult, what can we do to stay connected with our community and continue to make a contribution? If we are the son or daughter of an older adult, what can we do to reduce potentially challenging circumstances that lead to social isolation?

We need to look at how to support independence. It sounds counter intuitive, but introducing a little help earlier in the aging journey will go a long way to maintaining a higher quality of life and reducing preventable decline. The help can be from family and friends who can commit to being available on a regular or as-needed basis. Sometimes it makes sense to also invest in additional services to support the primary caregivers. A few stories come to mind as examples:

It has been our privilege to support a client with moderate dementia remain engaged in meaning activities such as having lunch with a peer group, volunteering in a greenhouse and visiting with long term care residents. Family was also highly engaged with their loved one in a variety of ways; our role was to provide companionship and outings while family members were at work.

An older adult with lots of vitality but lacking some physical mobility is able to remain in her home and spent her energy on the things that matter most to her. She is delighted to have a few visits per week for assistance with practical tasks in her home, which frees her up to take an art class and spend more time with family and friends, rather than needing “two days to recover” after changing the bedding or vacuuming.

One woman who was living with dementia was able to keep up her routine of swimming lengths at the pool each morning. The CAREGiver picked up her client, provided some cueing in the change room and assisted the client into the water. After that, pure joy! We also ensured the client was eating nutritious food and drinking enough water each day.

One gentleman lives on his own, family are out of town. He enjoys going for drives, stopping in at favorite, familiar coffee shops and venues. The CAREGiver encourages and assists with walking and other activities.

In helping their loved one remain independent and engaged in the community, family caregivers may reach a point where they need to make changes in their caregiving routine so that their energy is sustainable for the long term. While it can be a difficult decision, it is commendable when a family member can see the threat of burnout on the horizon and put plans in place for their own health so that they can continue providing care for a family member.

One of the ways to move forward is to acknowledge there is or could be a problem and seek agreement amongst those in our circle to address specific concerns. Often, the concerns are obvious: signs of aging – poor balance, loss of appetite, reduced mobility, lack of personal care, lack of medication management, loneliness, reduced cognition and the toll providing care is taking on family members. Sometimes these conditions are health related which can be improved medically. Decide what’s most important to address first and move in that direction. Determine to have a respectful, open handed, open hearted conversation.

To address being treated or treating other older adults with respect and ensuring social inclusion, here are a few reflective questions which may be helpful for you or family members.

  1. What is the biggest barrier to talking with our parents about how things may need to change as they age? Or, if we are the older adult, what is the biggest barrier preventing me for sharing my wishes or concerns with my children or closest friends?
  2. When it comes to helping older adults stay engaged in activities and connected in the community, what are some of the problems families face?
  3. In your situation, what are the three biggest concerns you are currently aware of?
  • ____________________________________________________________
  • ____________________________________________________________
  • ____________________________________________________________
  1. In your situation, what three things can you do this week to begin addressing your concerns?
  • ____________________________________________________________
  • ____________________________________________________________
  • ____________________________________________________________

Greg Charyna
M.Div., M.Ed., CPCA
Home Instead Senior Care

age-friendly, Programming, Services, Volunteering

Bus Buddy – Get Where you need to go

Bus Buddy Volunteer:

B:  Becoming a participant in the Bus Buddy Program gives you confidence to ride the bus.

U:  Using your bus pass, knowing where to ring the bell and getting on and off the bus safely are learned while riding the bus.

S:  Schedules, Bus Routes, Transfers and Bus Stops are explained so you are ready to ride the bus.

B:  Being with your volunteer for three trips gives you time to asks lots of questions.

U:  Using the bus gives you more independence to travel around the city.

D:  Destinations depend on where you would like to go and on what you would like to do.

D:  Doing errands, going to appointments or meeting friends for coffee are just some of the reasons to ride the bus.

Y:  You are the most important part of the Bus Buddy Program.

Being a Bus Buddy Volunteer is so much fun. 

I love it!   Kathryn

 

 

age-friendly, Publications

Goodbye Freedom 55.  Hello Freedom 70+

by Murray Scharf

As a result of the increasing longevity and healthy-life period of older adults, the work opportunities and financial needs of older adults have changed significantly.  For the cohort of people born in the 1920s, the life expectancy was less than 65 years and for those reaching retirement, the life expectancy was three years for males and eight years for females. Thus, “freedom 55” had some valence.

However, for the current cohort of retirees, those born in the 1950s, the average person was expected to reach 65 and, on average, enjoy 13 years of retirement for males and 17 years for females.  The current cohort entering the workforce are expected to live well into their 80s with nearly one quarter living to the age of 100.  A ‘Third Age’ has been inserted into our lives.  Thus, “Goodbye Freedom 55; Hello Freedom 70+.”

In recognition of this ‘Third Age’, the Saskatoon Council on Aging, in partnership with Radius, Saskatoon YWCA, the Saskatoon Chapter of the Saskatchewan Retired Teachers, and the North Saskatchewan Branch of the Canadian Corps of Commissionaires, has undertaken The New Horizons: Seniors Encore Career Project.  The purpose of the Project is to facilitate the engagement of older adults in the workforce and in entrepreneurial pursuits.  The general aim is “to consider ways of redesigning life so that long lives become a gift that is energizing, creative and fun.”

The Encore Careers Project encompassed two stages: an exploratory stage to assess the needs of older adults, and a second stage to explore career transition options.  In the exploratory stage, focus groups and individual interviews were held with selected samples of older adults. The focus was on the older adults employed, seeking employment or wishing to enter into entrepreneurial endeavours.  In the second stage, the focus was on service agencies and employers.  The Project is ongoing with a focus on workshops and the employer dimensions.

It was soon realized that one of the major needs was for the development of a pathways and agencies document that could serve as a road map for individuals and agencies seeking support and services.  As a result, the Directory of Service Agencies was developed.  This document will be made available through the SCOA website: http://www.scoa.ca/publications.html.

age-friendly, Events, Partners

SCOA Globe Walk – Celebrating 5 Years

The SCOA Globe Walk Celebration Luncheon was held at the Western Development Museum on Wednesday, May 9, 2018.  This year also marks the 5th anniversary of the project and some amazing milestones:

  • 2014 47 Teams 1210 Participants 145,538 miles
  • 2015 60 Teams 1789 Participants 285,525 miles
  • 2016 75 Teams 2486 Participants 437,000 miles
  • 2017 79 Teams 2640 Participants 481,785 miles
  • 2018  83 Teams 2850 Participants 500,000 miles (est.)

 In other words, nearly 11,000 Globe Walkers have logged more than 1,849,848 miles.  How’s that for success!

We have circumnavigated the Globe, traveled to the moon and back and orbited the International Space Station. This year we set a different type of goal – “Going for Gold”. We chose to take inspiration from the Canadian athletes participating in the 2018 Winter Olympic/Paralympic Games and work toward our own Globe Walk Olympic medals.  200+ miles = a Gold Medal.

We were honored to have Canadian Paralympian and Olympic Ambassador Colette Bourgonje as our keynote speaker. 

Globe Walk Luncheon

The SCOA Globe Walk would not be possible without the support of our sponsors and supporters:
Sponsors and Funders: 
R.H. Kilburn & Associates, Private Wealth Management – Investors Group
Community Initiatives Fund
Dakota Dunes Community Development Corporation

Supporters:
Saskatchewan Seniors Fitness Association
City of Saskatoon
Forever …in motion

For the second year, our presenting sponsor, Investors Group has generously offered to repeat last year’s very successful “Double Your Dollars“fundraiser.  How generous?  Every dollar you donate to Globe Walk will be matched by Investors Group (see below).  Many thanks to Richard Kilburn!

SCOA Globe Walk Celebration Luncheon

You may donate online via our partner Canada Helps .  Tax receipts are available if requested. You may also send a cheque to our office: SCOA 2020 College Drive, Saskatoon, S7N 2W4 or drop by to make a donation in person.

If you enjoy the Globe Walk program, please help us continue grow, improve and reach even more older adults.  Take advantage of the opportunity to double the value of your donation.  

If you have not done so already, consider joining a team or forming a new one in 2019.  We are successful for a reason:  the cost is small thanks to our sponsors 
(Globe Walk is a free SCOA program) but the benefits are huge!

Phone Beth at 306-652-0027 for more information or visit the Globe Walk website: scoaglobewalk.net