Health Services, Important Notices, Partners, Research

Pain Knowledge Needs of Family Caregivers and Persons with Dementia

The Saskatoon Council on Aging [SCOA] is pleased to collaborate with Dr. Susan Tupper on the research project “Pain Knowledge Needs of Family Caregivers and Persons with Dementia: Role of Virtual Reality as a Training Modality”. As a leading organization in the province dedicated to supporting positive aging through programs and services that enhance health, dignity, and independence for older adults, SCOA recognizes the importance of this research project for our community members.

Dr. Tupper and the Pain Dementia Virtual Reality Research Team have proposed to create an innovative training program on pain management for family caregivers and people with cognitive impairments related to dementia. Incorporating virtual reality videos into the training materials is an exciting new way to teach family members and people with dementia about pain. The training materials will be developed based on family member input, and their perspectives on the new virtual reality video will help shape the training program in ways that truly support older adults in Saskatchewan. This education will help our families to better cope with pain and prevent suffering and the many negative consequences of living with pain.

In the news: 

CBC Saskatoon May 20, 2019: Pain researcher uses VR to help caregivers deal with dementia patients’ pain. 

CBC Blue Sky May 29, 2019: Managing Acute and Chronic Pain: A panel of Saskatchewan Experts 

The research is funded by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation and Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation Advancement Inc.

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Health Services, Services

Connected Care – Community Health Centre at Market Mall

Purpose: The focus of this Centre is to provide specialty care to older adults (50+) with non‐life threatening complex care needs.

Complex care includes:

  • Changes in mobility or changes in memory
  • Increasing challenges in managing day-to-day activities
  • Increased difficulty coping with life’s events
  • Increasing unstable chronic health conditions e.g. COPD

This specialty care is designed to be a form of support that bridges the transition from the hospital to home and to support patients dealing with one or a combination of the following issues: multiple chronic conditions; mental health issues; medication‐related problems; and social vulnerability.

Accessing services:

The Community Health Centre is not a family physician clinic or walk‐in clinic. To access services, please contact your family physician  for a referral. 
Note: A portion of daily appointments are reserved for anyone requiring rapid access to services based on their complex care needs.

Services include:

  • In‐depth medical assessments
  • Chronic disease management and treatment
  • Physiotherapy and occupational therapy
  • Support from Community Mental Health Nurses (onsite) and social worker home visits
  • Help navigating the health and social services systems
  • Home Care (mobile)
  • Community paramedicine (mobile)

Clinics – offered on a rotating basis
Dental screening and referral
Home Care (mobile)
Stroke care follow-up (upon referral)

Community Health Centre at Market Mall Unit #55, Market Mall
2325 Preston Avenue South
Saskatoon, SK S7J 2G2
Located in mall, near parkade stairwell and elevator

Phone: 306‐844‐4050
Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Daily, including statutory holidays CHCMarketMall@saskhealthauthority.ca

Download Connected Care ‐ Community Health Centre at Market Mall Fact Sheet produced by the Saskatchewan Health Authority

age-friendly, Classes, Fitness and dance, Health Services

Winter Fitness Opportunities

SCOA Globe Walk 2019: STAY FIT THIS WINTER

If you are 50+ years – challenge yourself and motivate others to take part in a fun winter fitness program – with a bonus of great social activities. You’ll stay active and work with your team to achieve an awesome  new Globe Walk goal.   Read more 

Saskatchewan Seniors Fitness Association Activities

Discover the many activities SSFA  provides for members in order to assist them in achieving active lifestyles as well as making new friends through socializing with fellow members. It is our goal to improve the well-being of seniors by planning and organizing physical, cultural, social and intellectual activities. Read more ….

Bridge City Senioraction

A 55 plus co-ed seniors exercise club,  whose members are interested in improving their quality of life through a program of physical fitness.
Annual membership $20 per year, drop in fee $2.00 per session.
Classes are held Tuesdays and Thursdays, Saskatoon Field House 9:30 am to 10:30 am.
All new members welcome. Phone Sheila 306-931-8053 or Kathy 306-244-0587 for more information.

Forever … in motion

Forever … in motion is a physical activity program for Older Adults 50+ in the community. Peer leaders teach safe exercises that include a warm-up, cardio, strength, balance and flexibility exercises.  Most classes are free or very low cost.  Participating in physical activity can reduce your risk of having a fall by 40 percent!  For more information or to find out about a Forever…in motion group near you contact us at 306-844-4080.

Fit Over 50 Program, City of Saskatoon : A Guide To Physical Activity For People 50+

  • Drop-in Fitness Programs
  • Registered Programs
  • Smart Start Beginner Fitness
  • Spotlight on Fitness: The First Step ProgramTM
age-friendly, Caregiving, Events, Health Services

Caregiver Week 2019

Caregiver Week March 17-23, 2019


Caregiver Logo 2011Care for the Caregiver Forum – Friday, March 22, 2019

  • Caregiver App Launch: Lorraine Holtslander and Shelley Peacock (University of Saskatchewan)
  • Caregiver Self-Care presentation : Jeanne Beaudoin (Saskatchewan Health Authority)
  • “The Vulnerability of Caregiving”: Facilitated group discussions

Circle Drive Alliance Church – 3035 Preston Ave. S.
10:00 am – 3:00 pm (Registration 9:30 am)
Music by: Harpist Heidi Derksen, Cellist Jillian Gushulak
Cost: $20 (Lunch included – must pay in advance)
To register call SCOA at 306-652-2255

Our thanks to Saskatoon Community Foundation


Caregiver Workshop – Monday, March 18, 2019

Cliff Wright Library presentation “Services for Caregivers”
Parkinson Canada presentation “Information for Caregivers”
Cliff Wright Library – 1635 McKercher Dr.
1pm-3pm
Cost: FREE
To register call 306-652-2255

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age-friendly, aging in place, Health Services, Services

Remembering When News

RWlogoThink of all the young toddlers you know. Why is it that they seem to pop right up every time they fall? The next question is why does it seem to get more and more difficult as we get older?

The good news is that techniques have been developed that help us, as older adults, get up off the floor if we have fallen and haven’t hurt ourselves. Knowing how to position our arms and legs before we even try to roll over and get into a sitting or crawling position can make a big difference.

The Remembering When program has prepared two videos; the first one shows some techniques that might make it easier to get up from a fall; the second one demonstrates how to talk someone through the process and assist them up if they have fallen.

·       Getting up from a fall: 

·       Helping someone up from a fall: 

The techniques shown in the video are important to understand and practice long before you need them. Take the time to go through them thoroughly and practice them regularly so when you need them, you remember what to do and have maintained the abilities/strength you need to be successful.

Steps to follow (Public Health Agency of Canada)

1)    Lie on your side; bend the leg that is on top and lift yourself onto your elbows or hands.

2)    Pull yourself toward an armchair or other sturdy object, then kneel while placing both hands on the chair or object.

3)    Place your stronger leg in front, holding on to the chair or object.

4)    Stand up.

5)    Very carefully, turn and sit down.

If you would like more information about the videos or would like to book a Remembering When presentation focussing on fire safety and fall prevention, please contact Dori Krahn at 206-975-7715 or dori.krahn@saskatoon.ca

The Remembering When program is a partnership between SCOA and the Saskatoon Fire Department.

age-friendly, aging in place, Events, Health Services, Important Notices, Partners, Programming

Remembering When News

Upcoming Presentations

 

May 31st at 1:30 p.m.
St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church
436 Spadina Crescent Lower Hall

If you are interested in having a Remembering When™ presentation for your group or would like more information, please contact Dori Krahn (306)975-7715.

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Remembering When is a program designed by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) that uses nostalgia to promote eight fire safety and eight fall prevention messages through group presentations and home visits. The goal of the program is to help older adults eliminate fire and fall hazards in their environment so that they can stay in their homes if they would like. Through the program, we also teach what to do in the event of a fire and how to get up from the floor if you have fallen and are not hurt. 

Annual General Meeting, Caregiving, Events, Health Services

Executive Director’s Report – May 2018

Did you know – SCOA’s Positive Aging Resource Centre and Caregiver Information and Support Centre are unique to Saskatchewan?

One in five Canadians are caregivers and they are an essential link in the health care chain, though often forgotten. Many caregivers are sandwiched between employment and caregiving duties which creates extreme stress. If stress continues, caregiver burnout often results. Inability to find information and support is the cause of much caregiver frustration.

Our Centre provides information and support for older adults and caregivers in Saskatoon and for other provinces. This past year SCOA had over 22,902 visitors and requests for services at our Positive Aging Resource Centre in Saskatoon!

Caregivers enjoyed recent workshops provided by SCOA.  Some comments:
“it’s great to realize that I don’t have to be perfect; all so good, such a variety, thank you; I learned about taking time for me; it’s great to share tips from other caregivers; this information is exactly what we need to be a caregiver with less guilt; really important to be able to discuss in small groups – sharing time; liked the practical tools of self care and the phrase “things have changed and I have changed.”

We are grateful for the support of the Royal University Hospital Foundation Community Mental Health Endowment Grant program and for the opportunity to provide workshops to the many caregivers throughout the city. The most significant success of providing caregiver workshops is that they reduce isolation and facilitate the opportunity for learning, and social networking. This means less isolation, better connections to resources and tools, and the opportunity to share their experiences with other caregivers.