age-friendly, Important Notices, Programming

SCOA Globe Walk News

The Saskatoon Council on Aging and the SCOA Globe Walk committee is happy to announce that the SCOA Globe Walk will continue this season from January 2021 to May 2021. 

  • We are in the process of choosing a theme and events will be virtual this year. 
  • Information will be sent out to team captains by October 1st regarding registering their teams and how the events will work.  
  • If you are not on a team we would be glad to put on SCOA’s team. Phone 306.652.2255 or email admin@scoa.ca
  • Information about lanyard sales for walking the track will be sent out to team captains to send to their teams once dates and costs are determined.

For more information visit the SCOA Globe Walk website

age-friendly, Caregiving, Programming

Caregiver Forum 2020

Annual Forum Programming

MARK YOUR CALENDAR for the SCOA Caregiver Virtual Online Forum in November (watch for registration reminders in October)
Webinar: featuring Virtual Reality for Pain Management and Dementia Dr. Susan Tupper (PT, PhD, Saskatchewan Health Authority)

SCOA Caregiver Forum Virtual Reality for Pain Management and Dementia
Date: Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Thank you to grantors and partners: Saskatoon Community Foundation, Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation [SHRF], Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation

age-friendly, Classes, Programming, Technology

What’s New for Fall 2020

Saskatoon Council on Aging  Fall Class and Program Schedule

This schedule subject to change. Locations/Delivery format: online or onsite at 2020 College Dr. [Field House] or TBD.  Social distancing in effect for classes held onsite, small class sizes maintained. 

To register: Phone 306.652.2255 pay by credit card or send cheques to SCOA, 2020 College Dr. Saskatoon, S7N 0W4 
Note: Class fees must be paid in advance. Registration begins September 1, 2020.

TECHNOLOGY

2018-ipad-iphoneAPPLE TECHNOLOGY CLASSES
Beginner one-on-one – Apple ONLY
Become more confident using your Apple iPad,iPhone, Computer or Watches.
Register now for 1 classes of 1.5 hrs which includes a take home manual. Must bring your device. Cost: $20

Tuesday afternoons. 1pm to 2:30pm To register: phone 306.652.2255

IOS 13/14 Apple operating system and iPhone/iPad photography/CloudAdvanced Tech classes. Mystified with the Apple system update (IOS 13/14) Having troubles with photos stored on the “Cloud”? Small group class sessions with social distancing – register early.
Class format to be announced. e.g. online, onsite etc. Sign up list : phone 306.652.2255

  1. IOS System Update 13/14 
    Tuesday, Nov 3 1:30pm – 3:00pm Cost: Free  – Online via ZOOM
  2.  iCloud/Photography
    Tuesday, Nov 17 1:30pm – 3:00pm Cost: Free – Online via ZOOM 

SENIORS TECH BUDDY – ALL DEVICES
Learn how to use your tech device! Older adults work one-on-one with local high school students to learn how to use their iPads, iPhones, Android, tablets, laptops or other mobile devices. DATE TBA
COST: $10
Transportation is available for those in need!
Pending COVID-19 restrictions – sign up list phone 306.652.2255

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For more information and support, please visit the  Seniors Help website


ART CLASSES

roseAcrylic Rose with Dew Drops Art Class
Learn colour mixing and soft blending techniques. Use a muted background to enhance this pretty flower, enjoy learning how to blend soft petals and a dew drop or two, to really make this happy flower sing. A great gift for a loved one. 8”x10” canvas.
All materials included.

Monday, Nov 9, 2020 1pm-4pm $50
(Socially distanced at SFH)

LandscapeAcrylic Prairie Landscape Art Class
Prairie landscapes can be challenging to paint. Excitement can be created, using an interesting colour scheme of yellow and violet fields. A distant elevator can also infuse the work with a nostalgic feeling of hometown Saskatchewan. Join Cecilia on Memory Lane and looking back to our roots. 8”x10” canvas. All materials included

Monday, Nov 23, 2020 1pm-4pm $50
(Socially distanced at SFH)


LIFESKILLS

Older Adults Lifeskills Class
Webinar discussing “End of life planning” and “Power of Attorney.”
Canadian Foundation for Economic Education
Thursday, Nov 12 2020 1pm Cost: FREE
TO REGISTER


Virtual Learning for Older Adults programs are supported by the Government of Canada’s Emergency Community Support Fund and Saskatoon Community Foundation.

Classes, Partners, Programming, Research, Services

Want to Stay Connected?

Are you looking for ways to stay connected during the COVID-19 pandemic?
The Saskatoon Council on Aging can help:

Phone Call Program FB Ad

Telephone Visit Program – Talk with a friendly volunteer over the phone. To register phone SCOA 306.652.2255  More information


MailChimp Image and caption 550 X 250-5
Physical distancing does not have to mean social distancing.

Explore new ways to socialize and stay connected with other older adults who share your interests.  SCOA partners with the University of Saskatchewan to train older adults to use technology to stay connected and provide social opportunities.
Option to participate in a voluntary research component. Read more about this project

Phone Dr. Megan O’Connell 306.966.2496 or email megan.oconnell@usask.ca

For more information and support, please visit the  Seniors Help website

age-friendly, Events, Programming, Services

Live on Zoom: Musical Finale with Harreson James

Calling all Hub Clubbers and older adults

The Saskatoon Council on Aging and the University of Saskatchewan invite you to join our “Virtual” Seniors Neighbourhood Hub Club!
LIVE ON ZOOM:
Online Musical Performance with Harreson James
When: May 28th, 2020 at 1 pm NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED:

HOW TO JOIN:  
How to Join the webinar  PDF or WATCH VIDEO INSTRUCTIONS

Please click this link to join!     If prompted, enter: Webinar ID: 886 9082 7261

HJ-Harreson-20

Do you have a computer, tablet or an iPad? Join us for this lighthearted, entertaining musical performance.

Along with some great tunes, we’ll also be releasing the NEW fall schedules for all the Hub Clubs in the city. Join us for some rockin’ good tunes!

Don’t know how to use Zoom?

Are you joining by ipad or tablet or smartphone for the first time? You will need to be able to download the Zoom app. We can help, but you will need your username and password to download apps.

No problem, click on this link for a step by step demonstration.
A collection of how-tos for using Zoom
Participating in a Zoom Webinar Quick Start Guide

Tech Support  PDF Instructions:
Android – How to install Zoom on a computer or tablet
Computer – How to create a Zoom account
Computer – How to install Zoom and join a meeting
iPad or iPhone – How to install Zoom and join a meeting

Tech Support – Video Instructions:
How to install Zoom on Windows 10
How to use Zoom on Windows 10
How to install and use Zoom on iPad
How to install and use the Zoom app on an Android device

Still having problems with Zoom?

Again, no problem, the University of Saskatchewan is here to assist you with all of your Zoom tech questions.
For one-on-one assistance call Megan O’Connell at 1.306.966.2496?

if you are interested in virtual socialization hubs please click here 

age-friendly, Important Notices, Programming, Services, Volunteering

Telephone Visit Program

Like many other organizations we have cancelled and postponed events until it will be deemed safe by government and health authorities.  As a result of COVID-19, older adults are at high risk for social isolation. They lack opportunities to stay engaged and socialize with others; a key component to health and wellness. They also lack access to current or reliable information as many do not use or cannot access the internet. This may further impede their ability to access basic necessities such as groceries, health products or medical assistance.

The Saskatoon Council on Aging is working with community organizations on a new project to support isolated older adults. We will launch a Telephone Visit program that matches seniors with trained and screened volunteers from community organizations. The volunteers will connect with older adults once or twice a week to chat. Conversations can be short or long and can cover any topic from pets to gardening. The volunteers are not social workers, doctors or any other health care professional. They are just regular people that want to help and touch base with older adults.  The only information that will be shared is a first name and a phone number. Seniors can also pick the best time for volunteers to call.

SCOA will be a central intake agency to provide callers with referrals and support relating to COVID-19.  If the senior is experiencing isolation they would be connected to friendly volunteers that would be a “telephone buddy” .

To register phone SCOA 306.652.2255 

Funded by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program
In partnership with United Way of Saskatoon and Area.

Background: 

The Saskatoon Council on Aging [SCOA] serves the approximately 80,000 older adults 55 and over in Saskatoon and area. The coronavirus outbreak has profoundly impacted the lives of older adults. They are at a high risk to become socially isolated due to necessary social distancing measures designed to keep them safe.

Prior to the crisis, SCOA provided many opportunities for older adults to socialize and stay connected. We presently have a membership of 4500 older adults. We keep people informed through our one stop information and resource centre, caregiver information and support centre, newsletters, directory of services for older adults, spotlight on Seniors trade show and our websites.  Our programs and services including seniors neighborhood hub clubs, century club, life- long learning programs and globe walk program keep older adults socially connected, engaged, active and healthy.

 

 

 

Annual General Meeting, Classes, membership, Partners, Programming, scoamembership, Services, Uncategorized

Join Us! Be a SCOA member today!

diverseseniors

5 Great reasons to buy or renew 2020-2021 membership: 

1. You access learning, fitness and social opportunities: SCOA Globe Walk, Hub Clubs, classes
2. You stay informed with information that matters to you: monthly eNews, Coming of  Age newsletter, resource centre
3. You receive discounts at participating partnersand our special coupon pack
4. You have a vote and a voice at our Annual General Meeting
5. You build an age-friendly community where older adults are valued and included

TOGETHER WE ARE STRONGER

YOU  can help SCOA build a better future with older adults – Buy or renew your membership today!

Single 25 | Couples 35 |
1. Phone 306.652.2255 to pay by credit card
2. Visit our office 2020 College Drive [Field House]
3. Online at our website

More information about SCOA membership [Memberships run April 1 to March 31]

Note: If you have already purchased or renewed your membership – Thank You!

age-friendly, Events, Programming, Volunteering

Rainbow 50+

You are invited to be part of a great seniors’ group!

Rainbow 50+ provides a weekly program for seniors over 50. The program consists of socializing, exercise, lunch and entertaining or educational programming. We would welcome you to join us for the program.

We also urgently need people who would help with meal preparation and, especially, help plan and purchase ingredients for the lunch. All expenses are reimbursed. We are an enthusiastic group (mainly seniors ourselves)!

When: We meet Tuesdays from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

Where: in the basement of St. Thomas Wesley United Church at the corner of Ave. H and 20th Street. (If the main door is locked go to the west door and ring the doorbell.)

For more information call Maureen at 306-321-7580 or drop by to see what we are about! 

age-friendly, Programming

Survey Results: The Gift of a Long life

Abstract: The Gift of a Long Life Survey

Increasingly people are living into their 90s and 100s and beyond. This is a fairly new happening sometimes referred to as “pioneering again”. The Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) Communication Committee decided to ask the (200+) Century Club members (must be 90 to join) about pioneering/living into the 90s and 100s. Thirty (30) members responded to the survey. The survey was looking for evidence of pioneering, breaking new ground; what it found was strong evidence of positive aging. 

SCOA’s Vision is Positive Aging for All. Positive aging involves a view of aging as a healthy, normal part of life. Those who age positively, tend to live longer, healthier lives and enjoy a better quality of life.   The object is to arrive at our older years with a positive attitude, feeling good about ourselves, making our own choices, feeling in control, keeping fit and healthy and maintaining social networks. Obviously this also takes good genes, adequate resources, an age-friendly environment and a bit of luck!  

Responders to the survey offered a variety of thoughtful comments, but essentially most are continuing their life journeys to the best of their abilities. Most responders have accepted their life stage although some expressed regret. They identify as alert, active, engaged individuals who are mostly maintaining the lives and interests they have always known. Many noted that despite the advancing years, “I am still the same person!” They are motivated live a well-balanced lifestyle in order to remain well and mobile. Of those who have health and mobility issues, most do not dwell on the physical inconveniences that aging brings and appear satisfied with their quality of life.  A few noted they need to prepare for the future, to have their house in order. A positive attitude is probably their greatest strength.   

Concerns centered largely on losses: loss of independence (giving up the car, the home), mobility, family, friends and opportunity. The loss of the ability to care for self is most significant because it results in the need for care and support.  A few expressed financial worries.  Those living independently now wish to remain so for as long as possible. Many respondents live in senior residences. Daily contact with other residents and staff is mostly appreciated. However, some find congregate living quite difficult at least at the beginning. Having a lot of people around who are mostly strangers with lots of ‘coming and going’ takes some adjusting. 

Thanks to the members of the Century Club who responded for giving us a glimpse of life in the 90s and 100s and to remind us that a long life well-lived is truly a gift. As one respondent noted, “Life is good!” 

Members of the Saskatoon Council on Aging’s Century Club were surveyed for their thoughts about growing older. The Century Club is a special club for older adults 90 and over who are determined to live as full a life as possible.
The following are the thoughts they shared.

  1. How are you pioneering/ living life in your 90s and 100s?

  • Most say they are doing well, carrying on as independently as possible and doing their best to live a ‘normal’ life.  It’s Important to be happy, to enjoy what you do, and what you still can do on your own to the best of your abilities. There’s more time now to appreciate family. Also, there’s freedom to do what you choose, not what others say you should. It’s okay to slow down, to not participate in everything but should keep up your interests. Use mobility and other aids available to remain independent.
  • Dealing with loneliness, coming to terms with loss and accepting help is difficult.
  • This is a time of transitions: from home to senior’s residence, from being fully independent to needing support, from good health to failing health. Being reconciled to possible future needs makes it easier to move to support accommodation.
  • Living arrangements vary. Some live independently in their original home or a condo. Moving is a most significant event. Others say they are living  ‘independently’ in a senior’s residence which means they look after their own needs, usually make their own breakfasts and lunches and take the dinner the residence offers. Senior residences offer a wide range of activities that seem popular and keep people up and about, active, and making new friends. People contact is mostly appreciated.
  •   One respondent noted difficulty in finding wearable clothes – the ‘new’ styles are “not easy to adapt to”.

2.  What new challenges have you encountered, both positive and negative?

  • On the positive side, being able to look after own affairs, not having to do heavy physical work and having fewer responsibilities for yard and home.
  • Finding productive ways to use the free time that is available now, keeping active, learning new games, exercising, getting out and doing things are some positive challenges. The positive attitude of support staff is appreciated.
  • On the negative side, getting used to congregate living is a huge challenge; With so many people around, coming and going, especially when you don’t know their names is difficult.
  • Some express frustration with so much technology; e.g. have difficulty ordering the taxi/access bus.
  • Regarding transportation: giving up the car is a huge transition and the major cause of loss of independence. The inconvenience and reluctance of having to depend on others for transportation and being unable to travel at will is mentioned often.
  • The fear of loss of mobility, becoming a burden on others, is on many minds as is the challenge of adjusting to physical and mental limitations – preferably without complaining! Finding the right size and style of clothing seems a common problem,

3. How are you adapting to a longer life and what if anything are you doing differently?

  • Respondents described how they have adapted – some examples:
  • I cut down on a few of the many things done for years but basically continue with most of former involvements
  • Doing things I enjoy, also enable me to exercise to help with my health. I do what I can. I don’t expect to do as much as I did when younger. I keep busy and happy. I love company and I try to do the best and take care of myself I really can’t think of any major changes I have had to make
  • I have developed a fitness triad of trying to spend one hour a day in exercising each of my physical, mental and spiritual dimensions.
  • Finance is of great concern, outliving resources. (Actually, finances were seldom mentioned in the survey responses.)

4. What have you changed about yourself?

  • Not much change was reported, rather continuing as before and accepting themselves as they are now. Some feel they are more tolerant, others more outspoken but the common response is that “I’m still the same person as always”. Much more appreciative of all things around us like our country, medical care, friends and family, etc., and doing things to please themselves more often.

5. What new goals have you set for yourself?

  • A few new goals were reported, but most want to continue with what they are doing now – exercise, healthy eating, remaining positive and improving technical skills. Goals mentioned seem to depend on past living- more of this or that, carrying on,  but keeping in mind the need to be prepared for the future including  writing own obituary, getting affairs in order, culling and making order of possessions, helping friends and family, and being grateful for many blessings.

6. What advice would you give to someone in their 60s or 70s about living into the 90s?

Here is some of the advice shared:

  • Establish a healthy life style
  • Enjoy the life you are living in now. Remember old times and keep in touch with other old friends and family of course!
  • Do not stash away miscellaneous items that accumulate more and more until you find out you are becoming a hoarder
  • Enjoy each and every day
  • Enjoy your independence and don’t take it for granted, things changes.
  • Firstly, develop and maintain a positive outlook on life- you’ll find everything about life more enjoyable. If you have been an active volunteer, keep doing it. Don’t give up any hobbies or other activities. In other words, stay active, get lots of exercise, and you will certainly enjoy your retirement.
  • Life is sooo short, so prepare now!
  • Keep enjoying the day, socialize with good friends, enjoy the outdoors, keep mobile, watch your diet and celebrate every birthday and anniversary! Avoid people who are negative or make you feel unworthy. Embrace friends who are happy, reliable, and resilient.
  • Save money for your retirement – you can’t save too much.

7. What do you like about your life now?

The life now is the life they have made for themselves. The resources that senior’s residences offer are welcomed and used. The support, whether from family or the staff of the residence, is needed and appreciated. It’s most important that family visits and those relationships are maintained. Many like not having responsibilities and being free to do whatever they wish, and especially, being alive and well and able to participate in activities and being with friends.

8. What do you not like about your life now?

Some typical comments: 

  • Too often, after I’ve met new people and after they find out my date of birth, they act as if I’m totally incapable of any activity, mental or physical!! 
  • I struggle with the loss of independence. Things I used to take for granted now demand so much more energy and/or the assistance of others. 
  • Still miss my car!
  • I’m not as strong and agile as I used to be and my decreasing physical power. 
  • Taking my age into consideration – nothing!

9. Life is for living. What do you do to live to the fullest?

 Respondents shared some ways to keep themselves alert, active, interested and engaged: 

  • I surround myself with people. Always interesting! 
  • I seek out good books. I enjoy happy music and I subscribe to Turner Classic Movies. Best of all I look for happy people who bolster my self-esteem and make me laugh.
  • I have developed a fitness triad of trying to spend one hour a day in exercising each of my physical, mental and spiritual dimensions.  And, I spend more time at computer learning how to use it and expanding my world of interests. Keeping in touch with our expanding family adds joy. 
  • I keep in touch with my five children and their mates. As the grandchildren grow older, our friendship and love grows stronger. I’m getting to see some of my grandchildren getting married and working hard for their futures. 

10. Anything else you would like to share?

Enjoy living, keep a sense of humour, don’t allow yourself to get lonely, cultivate the happiness habit, do what makes you feel good, offer thanks for living where we do, and remember that Life is Good!

Classes, Lifelong Learning, Programming, Technology

SCOA Winter Classes & Programs

Note: All class/program fees must be paid in advance.
1. Phone 306-652-2255 to pay with credit card, OR
2. Mail a cheque to our office: SCOA, Saskatoon Field House, 2020 College Drive, Saskatoon, S7N 2W4 OR
3. Visit our office at the Field House


Literary Roundtable Discussions – CANCELLED

pile of books
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

This course will examine and discuss three famous short stories—“A New England Nun”, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman; “The Veldt”, by Ray Bradbury; and “The Boarding House”, by James Joyce. Each story is full of mysteries and unanswered questions. All stories are on the internet – please read them before the classes begin. Join Terry Matheson (PhD American Literature) and Brian Cotts (MA Literature) for three fascinating sessions (6hrs).

Wednesdays (April 8, 15, 221:30 pm – 3:30 pm $50
SCOA Boardroom


 Bird Identification – CANCELLED

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Identification and appreciation of local birds. This class will go beyond the basic identification of birds to consider more advanced visual identification and introduce birding by ear, along with some of the hidden aspects of birdsong. We will also cover bird migration and how it changes the mix of species locally over the course of the year. All classes indoors (6hrs).

Wednesdays (April 29, May 6, 13)  1 pm – 3 pm $50


Technology – CANCELLED

iphone-71
Apple Technology Classes

Beginner one-on-one Apple ONLY classes on Friday afternoons.
Become more confident using your Apple iPad, iPhone, Computer or Watches. Register now for 2 classes of 1.5 hrs (3 hrs) which includes a take home manual. Must bring your device.
Date: Friday afternoons Cost: $40

IOS 12/13 Apple operating system and iPhone/iPad photography/Cloud Classes
Mystified with the Apple system update (IOS 12/13) Having troubles with photos stored on the “Cloud”? Small group class sessions with 5 people per class – register early.

IOS System Update 12/13
Tuesday, Feb 4 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm  Cost: $20
iCloud/Photography
Tuesday, Jan 28 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm  Cost:$20

Tech Buddy – CANCELLED

1595860_web1_CyberSeniors-1---March-10-2017
Seniors Tech Buddy (Any type of technology device) One-on-one beginner technology workshops with students from local high schools.
Cost: $10 (Fee to cover administration costs) 306-652-2255 to register