age-friendly, covid-19, Important Notices, Research

Re-opening Saskatchewan – A Call to Action for a More Age-Friendly Community

As we look beyond the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) believes there must be a partnership among older adults, government and key stakeholders to address issues that impacted older people during this crisis.

SCOA wants to ensure that:
1. Voices of older adults are heard;
2. Diversity of perspectives of older adults is reflected in government public policy;
3. Older adults are engaged as co-leaders in developing policies that impact them directly.
Now is the time to seize the opportunity to improve policies, protocols and programs to address ageism, enhance the age-friendliness of communities, enable healthy, positive aging and support the well-being of older people across the province. Plan to talk to candidates in the upcoming provincial election! The pandemic is an opportunity to shift thinking, reset priorities and take action. Please use this information as you question candidates in your riding. 

Classes, Partners, Programming, Research, Services

Want to Stay Connected?

Are you looking for ways to stay connected during the COVID-19 pandemic?
The Saskatoon Council on Aging can help:

Phone Call Program FB Ad

Telephone Visit Program – Talk with a friendly volunteer over the phone. To register phone SCOA 306.652.2255  More information


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Physical distancing does not have to mean social distancing.

Explore new ways to socialize and stay connected with other older adults who share your interests.  SCOA partners with the University of Saskatchewan to train older adults to use technology to stay connected and provide social opportunities.
Option to participate in a voluntary research component. Read more about this project

Phone Dr. Megan O’Connell 306.966.2496 or email megan.oconnell@usask.ca

For more information and support, please visit the  Seniors Help website

age-friendly, Classes, covid-19, Lifelong Learning, Research, Technology

Using technology to reduce social isolation

Seniors are particularly impacted by social distancing measures to ensure safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many older adults feel more isolated than ever before. The Saskatoon Council on Aging is partnering with the University of Saskatchewan for an exciting new project to help older adults stay connected and access social opportunities.

SCOA will undertake a pilot project with researcher Megan E. O’Connell, a clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan.  The pilot involves showing older adults how to use the popular video conferencing app Zoom. Clinical psychology graduate students under Dr. O’Connell’s supervision will call older adults and walk them through getting them set up to use Zoom. Online or virtual groups will be organized for a variety of topics of interest to older adults including health and mental health.  Group sessions will be limited to 8 older adults and will allow time for questions and socialization.

To take part in the project phone Dr. O’Connell 1.306.966.2496

For more information and support, please visit the  Seniors Help website

The project will promote interactivity between older adults and sharing information through presentations. Technology will also reduce the social isolation experienced by many older adults. They will also experience increased mental engagement a
nd improved health and well being. Older adults will also learn new skills and find out new services available to them.

Social Conection

 

Health Services, Research

Try out the E-Music Box

LOOKING FOR 3 COUPLES IMPACTED BY EARLY STAGE DEMENTIA TO TRY OUT THE E-MUSIC BOX!

The E-music box is basically an electronic version of a mechanical music box, providing a new way for two people to make music together. No musical knowledge or experience required.  We are invitingthree couples impacted by early stage dementia to play E-music boxes together. We’ll meet with you for about two hours. You’ll learn to play songs together using E-music boxes. You’ll give us feedback and answer questions about the activity. And you’ll receive $25.00 each/$50.00 per couple.

Please contact us if you are curious and if you are:

• A couple, married or in a long-term relationship

• Age 55+ years

• Impacted by dementia — one of you diagnosed with dementia and in early stages

• Living together in Saskatoon

• Willing to meet with 2 research assistants in your home or community site like SCOA office?

For more information, email Dr Jennifer Nicol at jennifer.nicol@usask.ca OR leave a message at 306-966-5261. Thank you. FYI: This study has been reviewed by and received approval through the Research Ethics Office, University of Saskatchewan

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age-friendly, Events, Health Services, Research

Staying Strong, Balanced and Fast: Fall Prevention

KT poster Fall Prevention Sept 13 2019

Agenda:

1:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks – Dr. Joel Lanovaz, College of Kinesiology and Dr. Cathy Arnold, School of Rehabilitation Science, University of Saskatchewan

1:10 Importance of Research Improving Capacity to Prevent Fall-Related Injury – Cathy Arnold

1:20 Video: A Successful Collaboration and Emergence of FAST (Cathy Arnold and Melanie Weimer)

1:30 Results of first FAST pilot study – Cathy Arnold

1:40 How to measure Fall Arrest Capacity? Joel Lanovaz

Video: College of Kinesiology Labs, Developing Novel Measures (Joel Lanovaz, Jon Farthing, Glennis and Terry Stirling, Danelle Banman, Justin Pfifko)

1:50 FAST 1 and FAST 2 Study Designs and Results – Cathy Arnold and Joel Lanovaz

Video: What do these results mean for fall prevention? (Jenny Basran)

2:10 Introduction of FAST team members

2:20 Acknowledgement of student trainees and their work (Hayley Legg, Danelle Banman, Justin Pfifko, and others not here today)

2:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK and poster viewing

2:50 Welcome and words from collaborators:

June Gawdun, Executive Director, Saskatoon Council on Aging

Kimberly Willison, Lead for Forever in Motion

Cheryl Lehne, Lead for Staying on Your Feet

3:00 Final Words from Participants and PI

Video: (Janet Barnes, Cathy Arnold, Terry and Glennis Stirling, Neil Collins)

3:10 Break out session.. What’s next – Hearing from you (Café style – choose 2)

Questions to consider:

After hearing what you heard today, what would you like to see related to reducing fall-related injuries for older adults?

· Researchers to examine next?

· Health care system to do?

· Community organizations/groups/public to do?

· What would you do differently?

3:50 De-briefing, Closing remarks Cathy Arnold

Important Notices, Partners, Research, Technology

No Patient Left Behind: Electronic Health Record Use in Saskatchewan

We want to hear from you! No Patient Left Behind: Electronic Health Record Use in Saskatchewan

 Have you ever wanted to see or even access information in your medical record? Are you interested in learning more about what an Electronic Health Record (EHR) is? Or how it works? 

Your EHR is a secure and private lifetime record that gives you access to much of your health data through electronic devices (e.g.: computer, tablet or phone). In Canada, the EHR stores and provides information on your lab results, medication profiles, key clinical reports (e.g.: hospital discharge reports), diagnostic reports from x-rays or other similar tests, and your immunization history. This information can be seen by authorized health care providers and is becoming available for more and more patients to access across the country.  

This technology offers many benefits for patient and health care professionals. For example, the EHR gives patients the ability to see test results and previous and current prescriptions. Access to this data can reduce test duplication and increase communication with doctors and nurses saving time for both parties.  There are also potential challenges with EHR use, including technical difficulties, access to electronic devices and or internet connectivity and concerns about privacy and confidentially. 

Dr. Tracie Risling from the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan is partnering with SCOA on a new research project, No Patient Left Behind: EHR Use in Saskatchewan. This study is about supporting patients across the province to uptake and use their electronic health records. We want to hear from you! How would you want to learn about EHRs? What do think some of the challenges might be when it comes to using EHRs? What type of supports could be developed to support EHR users?

In the coming weeks, Dr. Tracie Risling and her team will be announcing dates for information sessions about EHR use in Saskatchewan and this research project. We are excited to start this research, working with SCOA and looking forward to meeting with those who are interested in sharing their thoughts about this technology and how best to use it.  

For more information on this project contact RisTech Research Coordinator Courtney Carlberg at courtney.carlberg@usask.ca 

This research is funded by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF) and the Saskatchewan Centre for Patient-Oriented Research (SCPOR). 

This research has been approved by the U of S Behavioural Ethics Board (BEH 1259). 

Health Services, Important Notices, Partners, Research

Pain Knowledge Needs of Family Caregivers and Persons with Dementia

The Saskatoon Council on Aging [SCOA] is pleased to collaborate with Dr. Susan Tupper on the research project “Pain Knowledge Needs of Family Caregivers and Persons with Dementia: Role of Virtual Reality as a Training Modality”. As a leading organization in the province dedicated to supporting positive aging through programs and services that enhance health, dignity, and independence for older adults, SCOA recognizes the importance of this research project for our community members.

Dr. Tupper and the Pain Dementia Virtual Reality Research Team have proposed to create an innovative training program on pain management for family caregivers and people with cognitive impairments related to dementia. Incorporating virtual reality videos into the training materials is an exciting new way to teach family members and people with dementia about pain. The training materials will be developed based on family member input, and their perspectives on the new virtual reality video will help shape the training program in ways that truly support older adults in Saskatchewan. This education will help our families to better cope with pain and prevent suffering and the many negative consequences of living with pain.

In the news: 

CBC Saskatoon May 20, 2019: Pain researcher uses VR to help caregivers deal with dementia patients’ pain. 

CBC Blue Sky May 29, 2019: Managing Acute and Chronic Pain: A panel of Saskatchewan Experts 

Saskatoon Tech Company Using  virtual reality to improve dementia care

The research is funded by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation and Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation Advancement Inc.

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Annual General Meeting, Important Notices, Partners, Research

May 2019: Message from the Executive Director

We have been busy getting ready for our Annual General Meeting to be held June 5 as you will read later in this newsletter.  Come join us and see what we have been up to the past year.  We are also gearing up for our annual fundraiser at the Western Development Museum called Grand “Old” Opry – Zoomer Style to be held March 27, 2020.  We currently are looking for bands and singers to audition for this event.  Please note if you are interested to audition to contact our office by June 3rd.

In the next few editions of this newsletter, you will find some notices from the University of Saskatchewan looking for focus group participants.  We are happy to be a partner with the U of S for these research projects. The projects range from accessing your electronic health records to how to recognize pain when caring for someone with dementia to how to manage medications if you have had a serious illness and have cancer.  You will hear more about these projects in future once the researchers are ready to start recruiting for participants.