age-friendly, Events, fundraising

Grand Old Opry Zoomer Style – Meet Joseph Klyne

klynne
Joseph Klyne

A professional guitarist by the age of 17, Joseph Klyne has had a successful music career for over 40 years. He first made his living playing lead guitar with various rock cover bands in Winnipeg Manitoba circa 1960. Joseph then developed his own “single” act in Edmonton in the early 70’s. In 1977 he moved to Saskatoon. In the mid 80’s his two sons joined and both took their turn playing bass and harmonizing to his exceptional singing and guitar playing. The J.R. Klyne duo performed throughout Saskatchewan into the early 90’s. Joseph’s guitar style is greatly inspired by Chet Atkins.

Grand Old Opry “Zoomer Style”
March 27, 2020
Western Development Museum
Enjoy a gala evening of country and western music presented by a talented roster of seasoned performers.
Doors open 5 pm Cash Bar
Supper 6 pm,  Entertainment 7:30  pm
Tickets: $100 [tax receipts issued $65]

Phone 306.652.2255 pay with credit card
Buy online at Eventbrite
Visit our office in the field house – 2020 College Drive

A fundraiser for the Saskatoon Council on Aging to provide health and wellness programs for older adults.

age-friendly, Events, fundraising

Grand Old Opry Zoomer Style – Meet the Paddlewheelers

paddlewheelers
Paddlewheelers

Wayne Salloum, Maurice Postnikoff and Doug Porteous came together fifteen years ago for a one time performance.  One thing led to another and the Paddlewheelers were born, a trio who have provided great entertainment in and around Saskatoon and Saskatchewan. Over time the Paddlewheelers added guitarist Evert Van Olst, base guitarist Jonathan Moore-Wright, and percussionist Brent Burlingham. Through guitar, voice, percussion and harp (harmonica) they have a great sound, breaking bread with the audience focusing on music of days gone by. The Paddlewheelers are truly grass roots Saskatchewan.

Grand Old Opry “Zoomer Style”
March 27, 2020
Western Development Museum
Enjoy a gala evening of country and western music presented by a talented roster of seasoned performers.
Doors open 5 pm Cash Bar
Supper 6 pm,  Entertainment 7:30  pm
Tickets: $100 [tax receipts issued $65]

Phone 306.652.2255 pay with credit card
Buy online at Eventbrite
Visit our office in the field house – 2020 College Drive

A fundraiser for the Saskatoon Council on Aging to provide health and wellness programs for older adults.

age-friendly, Events, fundraising

Grand Old Opry Zoomer Style – Meet shuboy

shuboy
Shuboy

Shuboy is an old school street musician based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan . An accomplished performer on the slide guitar and a skilled harp player, he can be found performing originals and covers on his National Steel tricone resonator, homemade cigarbox guitars and harp at summer festivals and fringes across Canada .. and of course, all the best sidewalks. Finding inspiration on the streets, shuboy is fearless when it comes to mixing genres. Injecting his blues into country, bluegrass, jazz, rap, everything in between. Successfully completing his Western 2019 “shuboy’s Traveling Medicine Show” tour, he is planning Eastern Traveling Medicine Showtour in 2020.

Grand Old Opry “Zoomer Style”
March 27, 2020
Western Development Museum
Enjoy a gala evening of country and western music presented by a talented roster of seasoned performers.
Doors open 5 pm Cash Bar
Supper 6 pm,  Entertainment 7:30  pm
Tickets: $100 [tax receipts issued $65]

Phone 306.652.2255 pay with credit card
Buy online at Eventbrite
Visit our office in the field house – 2020 College Drive

A fundraiser for the Saskatoon Council on Aging to provide health and wellness programs for older adults.

age-friendly, Awards, Events

City Receives Age-friendly award

Dr. Murray Scharf accepted the Age-friendly award on behalf of the City of Saskatoon.

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The City of Saskatoon is honored to accept the Age-Friendly Recognition Award from the Province of Saskatchewan, an award that recognizes success and encourages communities to take sustainable action towards becoming Age-friendly. We commend and thank the Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) for its part in earning this award for the City of Saskatoon

The work that brought this about was a project called the Age-Friendly Saskatoon Initiative that was originated and led by the Saskatoon Council on Aging and aimed at community change intended to establish Saskatoon as an age-friendly city. The City was pleased to cooperate with the project and to implement some of its outcomes.

With the growing population of seniors, the City of Saskatoon recognizes the key role it plays in helping to establish clear policy directions for the programs and services required by older adult citizens.

As the provider of many programs, services and infrastructure for the residents

of Saskatoon, the City works to ensure these structures are responsive to the needs of the residents. Fundamental to creating an age-friendly community is a shift in people’s attitude toward a more positive view of aging and older adults. Enabling older adults to engage in social and community activities helps maintain their connections to other people and the community; all of which contribute to an improved overall quality of life.

A commitment to respect and to include older adults is a true measure of a society’s support for the quality of life and social well-being of all of its citizens. To demonstrate the City’s commitment to this great community work, the City of Saskatoon’s Strategic Plan, 2013 – 2023, under the Strategic Goal of Quality of Life, identified as a priority, “the development of age-friendly initiatives to enhance quality of life as people age”.

The Age-friendly Saskatoon Initiative achieved a significant level of success in its efforts to positively change community conversations about an aging population in Saskatoon. This was largely due to the enthusiasm and expertise that older adult volunteers provided and the thousands of hours that they dedicated over the 5 years of the Initiative to ensure the attainment of the project goals. In 2017, following the completion of the Initiative, the City of Saskatoon applied for and was granted full membership in the WHO Global Age-friendly Cities Network.

We look forward to continuing our collaboration with the Saskatoon Council on Aging                   to make Saskatoon a truly age-friendly city. Thank you once again for this award.

trio_blog

age-friendly, Programming

Survey Results: The Gift of a Long life

Abstract: The Gift of a Long Life Survey

Increasingly people are living into their 90s and 100s and beyond. This is a fairly new happening sometimes referred to as “pioneering again”. The Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) Communication Committee decided to ask the (200+) Century Club members (must be 90 to join) about pioneering/living into the 90s and 100s. Thirty (30) members responded to the survey. The survey was looking for evidence of pioneering, breaking new ground; what it found was strong evidence of positive aging. 

SCOA’s Vision is Positive Aging for All. Positive aging involves a view of aging as a healthy, normal part of life. Those who age positively, tend to live longer, healthier lives and enjoy a better quality of life.   The object is to arrive at our older years with a positive attitude, feeling good about ourselves, making our own choices, feeling in control, keeping fit and healthy and maintaining social networks. Obviously this also takes good genes, adequate resources, an age-friendly environment and a bit of luck!  

Responders to the survey offered a variety of thoughtful comments, but essentially most are continuing their life journeys to the best of their abilities. Most responders have accepted their life stage although some expressed regret. They identify as alert, active, engaged individuals who are mostly maintaining the lives and interests they have always known. Many noted that despite the advancing years, “I am still the same person!” They are motivated live a well-balanced lifestyle in order to remain well and mobile. Of those who have health and mobility issues, most do not dwell on the physical inconveniences that aging brings and appear satisfied with their quality of life.  A few noted they need to prepare for the future, to have their house in order. A positive attitude is probably their greatest strength.   

Concerns centered largely on losses: loss of independence (giving up the car, the home), mobility, family, friends and opportunity. The loss of the ability to care for self is most significant because it results in the need for care and support.  A few expressed financial worries.  Those living independently now wish to remain so for as long as possible. Many respondents live in senior residences. Daily contact with other residents and staff is mostly appreciated. However, some find congregate living quite difficult at least at the beginning. Having a lot of people around who are mostly strangers with lots of ‘coming and going’ takes some adjusting. 

Thanks to the members of the Century Club who responded for giving us a glimpse of life in the 90s and 100s and to remind us that a long life well-lived is truly a gift. As one respondent noted, “Life is good!” 

Members of the Saskatoon Council on Aging’s Century Club were surveyed for their thoughts about growing older. The Century Club is a special club for older adults 90 and over who are determined to live as full a life as possible.
The following are the thoughts they shared.

  1. How are you pioneering/ living life in your 90s and 100s?

  • Most say they are doing well, carrying on as independently as possible and doing their best to live a ‘normal’ life.  It’s Important to be happy, to enjoy what you do, and what you still can do on your own to the best of your abilities. There’s more time now to appreciate family. Also, there’s freedom to do what you choose, not what others say you should. It’s okay to slow down, to not participate in everything but should keep up your interests. Use mobility and other aids available to remain independent.
  • Dealing with loneliness, coming to terms with loss and accepting help is difficult.
  • This is a time of transitions: from home to senior’s residence, from being fully independent to needing support, from good health to failing health. Being reconciled to possible future needs makes it easier to move to support accommodation.
  • Living arrangements vary. Some live independently in their original home or a condo. Moving is a most significant event. Others say they are living  ‘independently’ in a senior’s residence which means they look after their own needs, usually make their own breakfasts and lunches and take the dinner the residence offers. Senior residences offer a wide range of activities that seem popular and keep people up and about, active, and making new friends. People contact is mostly appreciated.
  •   One respondent noted difficulty in finding wearable clothes – the ‘new’ styles are “not easy to adapt to”.

2.  What new challenges have you encountered, both positive and negative?

  • On the positive side, being able to look after own affairs, not having to do heavy physical work and having fewer responsibilities for yard and home.
  • Finding productive ways to use the free time that is available now, keeping active, learning new games, exercising, getting out and doing things are some positive challenges. The positive attitude of support staff is appreciated.
  • On the negative side, getting used to congregate living is a huge challenge; With so many people around, coming and going, especially when you don’t know their names is difficult.
  • Some express frustration with so much technology; e.g. have difficulty ordering the taxi/access bus.
  • Regarding transportation: giving up the car is a huge transition and the major cause of loss of independence. The inconvenience and reluctance of having to depend on others for transportation and being unable to travel at will is mentioned often.
  • The fear of loss of mobility, becoming a burden on others, is on many minds as is the challenge of adjusting to physical and mental limitations – preferably without complaining! Finding the right size and style of clothing seems a common problem,

3. How are you adapting to a longer life and what if anything are you doing differently?

  • Respondents described how they have adapted – some examples:
  • I cut down on a few of the many things done for years but basically continue with most of former involvements
  • Doing things I enjoy, also enable me to exercise to help with my health. I do what I can. I don’t expect to do as much as I did when younger. I keep busy and happy. I love company and I try to do the best and take care of myself I really can’t think of any major changes I have had to make
  • I have developed a fitness triad of trying to spend one hour a day in exercising each of my physical, mental and spiritual dimensions.
  • Finance is of great concern, outliving resources. (Actually, finances were seldom mentioned in the survey responses.)

4. What have you changed about yourself?

  • Not much change was reported, rather continuing as before and accepting themselves as they are now. Some feel they are more tolerant, others more outspoken but the common response is that “I’m still the same person as always”. Much more appreciative of all things around us like our country, medical care, friends and family, etc., and doing things to please themselves more often.

5. What new goals have you set for yourself?

  • A few new goals were reported, but most want to continue with what they are doing now – exercise, healthy eating, remaining positive and improving technical skills. Goals mentioned seem to depend on past living- more of this or that, carrying on,  but keeping in mind the need to be prepared for the future including  writing own obituary, getting affairs in order, culling and making order of possessions, helping friends and family, and being grateful for many blessings.

6. What advice would you give to someone in their 60s or 70s about living into the 90s?

Here is some of the advice shared:

  • Establish a healthy life style
  • Enjoy the life you are living in now. Remember old times and keep in touch with other old friends and family of course!
  • Do not stash away miscellaneous items that accumulate more and more until you find out you are becoming a hoarder
  • Enjoy each and every day
  • Enjoy your independence and don’t take it for granted, things changes.
  • Firstly, develop and maintain a positive outlook on life- you’ll find everything about life more enjoyable. If you have been an active volunteer, keep doing it. Don’t give up any hobbies or other activities. In other words, stay active, get lots of exercise, and you will certainly enjoy your retirement.
  • Life is sooo short, so prepare now!
  • Keep enjoying the day, socialize with good friends, enjoy the outdoors, keep mobile, watch your diet and celebrate every birthday and anniversary! Avoid people who are negative or make you feel unworthy. Embrace friends who are happy, reliable, and resilient.
  • Save money for your retirement – you can’t save too much.

7. What do you like about your life now?

The life now is the life they have made for themselves. The resources that senior’s residences offer are welcomed and used. The support, whether from family or the staff of the residence, is needed and appreciated. It’s most important that family visits and those relationships are maintained. Many like not having responsibilities and being free to do whatever they wish, and especially, being alive and well and able to participate in activities and being with friends.

8. What do you not like about your life now?

Some typical comments: 

  • Too often, after I’ve met new people and after they find out my date of birth, they act as if I’m totally incapable of any activity, mental or physical!! 
  • I struggle with the loss of independence. Things I used to take for granted now demand so much more energy and/or the assistance of others. 
  • Still miss my car!
  • I’m not as strong and agile as I used to be and my decreasing physical power. 
  • Taking my age into consideration – nothing!

9. Life is for living. What do you do to live to the fullest?

 Respondents shared some ways to keep themselves alert, active, interested and engaged: 

  • I surround myself with people. Always interesting! 
  • I seek out good books. I enjoy happy music and I subscribe to Turner Classic Movies. Best of all I look for happy people who bolster my self-esteem and make me laugh.
  • I have developed a fitness triad of trying to spend one hour a day in exercising each of my physical, mental and spiritual dimensions.  And, I spend more time at computer learning how to use it and expanding my world of interests. Keeping in touch with our expanding family adds joy. 
  • I keep in touch with my five children and their mates. As the grandchildren grow older, our friendship and love grows stronger. I’m getting to see some of my grandchildren getting married and working hard for their futures. 

10. Anything else you would like to share?

Enjoy living, keep a sense of humour, don’t allow yourself to get lonely, cultivate the happiness habit, do what makes you feel good, offer thanks for living where we do, and remember that Life is Good!

Caregiving, fundraising

Dick’s Story

dick

As a caregiver, Dick Strayer knew what it was like to feel alone and not know where to turn. He is a founder of the Saskatoon Council on Aging’s [SCOA] Caregiver Support and Information Centre, a program that provides support for seniors who are caregivers. Through his work with the program, he spoke with hundreds of caregivers in Saskatoon and area.

“One of the best medicines is for caregivers to talk to other caregivers. Caregivers experience feelings of loneliness and it is great to find out that you are not alone, that there is someone there to help and where you can get advice.”

I’m a firm believer in the cause and I have a tremendous amount of respect for the organization. They deserve all the support that I can give them.”  ~ Dick Strayer

Dick’s vision for the future would be a provincial Caregiver program, training for caregivers and for people to know more about SCOA’s work.

“I devoted a lot of time to something that I truly believe in. It’s had an effect on my life no question.”

Dick gives to SCOA because “I’m a firm believer in the cause and I have a tremendous amount of respect for the organization. They deserve all the support that I can give them.”

“SCOA and Caregiver are at the top of my list always.”  ~ Dick Strayer

You can help us build a better future for older adults and caregivers – Donate now!

How to donate:
1. By Phone: 306.652.2255
2. in person at our office in the Saskatoon Field House, 2020 College Drive
3. Online at CanadaHelps 

Dick’s caregiving story

age-friendly, Important Notices, membership, scoamembership, Services, Uncategorized

Executive Director’s Message

Did you know that the Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) serves over 80,000 older adults in Saskatoon and area?  SCOA is a non-profit organization which began operations in 1991 and is dedicated to promoting positive aging for all in an age-friendly community.

Positive aging means feeling good, as you grow older. The key to positive aging is staying ACTIVE, ENGAGED and INFORMED.

  • You can stay ACTIVE through SCOA’s Globe Walk Program.
  • You can stay ENGAGED through SCOA’s Senior Neighborhood Hub Clubs, Century Club, and Lifelong learning programs.
  • You can stay INFORMED through SCOA’s information/resource centre and caregiver information and support centre and our publications.
  • Through SCOA’s Age Friendly Saskatoon Initiative the City of Saskatoon now belongs to the World Health Organization’s Global Network for Age-friendly Cities and Communities.   The network was established to foster the exchange of experience and mutual learning between cities and communities worldwide who are striving to better meet the needs of their older residents.  .

Some SCOA key projects and partnerships in the last few years that have emerged from the age-friendly initiative include:

  • Development of an Age-friendly lens that is used to encourage organizations to become age-friendly.
  • Building Respectful Inclusive Communities (training for older adults in congregate living how to combat bullying).
  • VIDEO with Saskatoon Fire, Police and Preston Park 1 (training police and fire to work with seniors).
  • Development of a Community Police and Fire Academy for older adults
    The “Remembering When” project with Saskatoon Fire (volunteers will visit you in your home to educate about fire safety)
  • VIDEO with City Transit (learn how to serve older adults and show older adults how to use City Transit).
  • Bus Buddy program(volunteers show older adults how to use transit)