fundraising, Important Notices

SCOA MEGA Raffle

It’s time for the Saskatoon Council on Aging MEGA Raffle!
Funds raised support programs and services for older adults impacted by the pandemic.

View our 25 exciting prize packages! Tickets $10 each
On sale now! [Total value $2045]
Draw Date and time: March 1, 2021 at 10 am

Click the white arrows on either side to scroll through/view the slide show

Buy tickets online: click the link below

   Mega Raffle Ticket
   $10.00
   Buy now 

Buy tickets by phone 306.652.2255

Buy tickets at the SCOA office, 2020 College Drive, [Saskatoon Field House]

Lottery License # SR20-0421

age-friendly, Annual General Meeting, Important Notices, membership

SCOA Annual General Meeting

Date: Wednesday, September 16, 2020
Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Online via ZOOM Register here:

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email with a link to join the meeting. In advance of the AGM, we will send all registered attendees the AGM meeting materials and step-by-step instructions for joining. Hard copies can be picked up at the Field House by September 9th. You can participate on your computer, ipad, or phone app.
Deadline to register: September 14.

Everyone is welcome to attend. Full members [memberships paid to March 31, 2021] have a vote at the meeting. Renew or purchase your membership –

If you have not used ZOOM before and would like additional help please contact our office 306.652.2255. The staff will be pleased to answer any questions and set you up with a student volunteer to assist you.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at the AGM!

age-friendly, covid-19

Emerging from the Pandemic:   Older Adults Reimagine a More Age-friendly Community

The responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in this community and around the world, rightly focused on protecting lives and preventing the spread of the virus. Unintended consequences however, have had an  detrimental effect on older adults who are  feeling the full impacts of economic, mental and physical effects of social isolation,  challenges to our human rights, neglect and abuse in institutions and care facilities and the trauma of ageist attitudes and discriminations.

It is true, the global pandemic has severely impacted everyone; however, it has disproportionately affected older adults. We are at higher risk of contracting the disease, and more likely to develop severe infections and die from it. In Canada, close to 90% of COVID-!9 related deaths have occurred in people over the age of 60 and a staggering 80% of COVID-19 deaths were in individuals who lived or worked in long term care facilities or other types of care homes. Social isolation, the closing of many parts of society, and the fear and anxiety associated with the pandemic are pronounced for seniors. Many older citizens face severe challenges meeting their basic needs, such as shopping for food, medications, and obtaining needed health and community care. Some live in potentially dangerous environments where elder abuse is a potential factor. Older adults living in care facilities have been denied access for months to those who love them and any contact has been reduced to electronic communication and window waves.

“Much research has shown that human connection is a key determinant of health, and COVID-19 restrictions, while necessary, don’t really justify complete isolation from family, caregivers and friends. “

The challenges that older adults are experiencing are not new and few are unique to the virus. But COVID-19 intensifies and complicates everything and exacerbates the many challenges faced by older adults. The most distressing are the ageist stereotypes and discriminations that have become more visible in the last few months. Ageism is defined as a process of systematic stereotyping of and discrimination against people because they are old. It means that older people are devalued and their human rights compromised. Indeed, older adults have become the focus of this pandemic and have been isolated or paternalistically (though well-intentioned) protected without their own choices being respected.

“People above the age of 65 are often assumed to be a homogeneous group of “older people” or “Seniors” who are frail, lack independent decision-making capacity and need to be protected. The reality is strikingly different.”

There are three distinct generations between the ages of 60 and 100. Close to 90% live independently and make significant contributions to society. For example, the restrictions on older adults’ abilities to engage in meaningful volunteer activities is impacting community organizations at a time when many need increased hours of volunteerism to meet the challenges of the pandemic. In the same way that infants, children and youth have very distinct characteristics, so too do different older adult generations. One size does not fit all.

The Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) tackles issues of importance to older adults and has continued to support older adult throughout the pandemic. We are uniquely positioned to communicate directly to citizens and public officials about what is at stake and what might be improved. SCOA can propose solutions that would improve policies and programs for an aging population and create a better quality of life for older citizens.  We hope that the spotlight on the experiences of older people during this crisis will bring stronger commitment to working toward a more age-friendly community.

SCOA has adopted the World Health Organization’s (WHO) “Age-Friendly Cities” model as a critical way to support older adults to age positively in Saskatoon. In an age-friendly city, policies, services, settings and structures support and enable people to age actively by recognizing the wide range of capacities and resources among older people, anticipating and responding flexibly to aging-related needs and preferences, respecting their decisions and lifestyle choices, protecting those who are most vulnerable and promoting their inclusion in and contribution to all areas of community life.

SCOA’s multi-year Age-friendly Saskatoon Initiative revealed three key issues that hundreds of older adults in Saskatoon identified as critical in ensuring a good quality of life:

  • Ageism is the greatest barrier older adults face.
  • Older adults want to have input into policies and programs that affect them.
  • The entire community has a role to play in creating an age-friendly environment.

As evaluations are carried out to examine COVID-19 pandemic responses how do we ensure that the voices of older adults are heard, that older persons are appropriately protected in the future, that we do not overlook how extremely diverse this age group is, how incredibly resilient we are, and the importance of the multiple roles we have in society, including as caregivers, employees, volunteers and community leaders? Here are some suggestions:

  1. Examine all policy decisions and community advisories through an age-friendly lens. SCOA has developed a tool just for this purpose. Policies need to be made with us not for us.
  2.  Begin to create and foster living environments that truly support quality of life in all its aspects from access to good health care to high quality food, recreation and community building. Ensure that staffing and care standards in both community and long term care are elevated to the same level of importance in the health care system as hospital care.  
  3. Begin right now, not after the pandemic is declared over, to develop a detailed provincial senior’s strategy that will re-examine and act upon the learnings of the pandemic on eliminating ageism, developing age-friendly communities and attending to mental health and self- determination.  Create a full spectrum of options for those who want to live independently, or with home care support, assisted and intermediate care living alternatives, and those who require complex care. Ensure that older adults lead/participate in this work.
  4. Open a public discussion about ethical responses and protection of human rights during this pandemic crisis and how as a community we can foster an age-friendly community that supports positive aging for all citizens.

SCOA’s hope is that by articulating these challenges and opportunities, we might move more quickly to minimize the negative outcomes of COVID-19, maximize positive changes that might be possible and redouble our efforts to improve our aging society in ways that benefit people across the life span.  We will emerge from this pandemic having paid a high price but more resilient and determined than ever. Now is the time to take bold action, create communities and caring environments that promote positive aging: something all of us deserve.

Candace Skrapek
Shan Landry
Jane McPhee
Past Presidents, Saskatoon Council on Aging

age-friendly, Important Notices, Programming, Services, Volunteering

Telephone Visit Program

Like many other organizations we have cancelled and postponed events until it will be deemed safe by government and health authorities.  As a result of COVID-19, older adults are at high risk for social isolation. They lack opportunities to stay engaged and socialize with others; a key component to health and wellness. They also lack access to current or reliable information as many do not use or cannot access the internet. This may further impede their ability to access basic necessities such as groceries, health products or medical assistance.

The Saskatoon Council on Aging is working with community organizations on a new project to support isolated older adults. We will launch a Telephone Visit program that matches seniors with trained and screened volunteers from community organizations. The volunteers will connect with older adults once or twice a week to chat. Conversations can be short or long and can cover any topic from pets to gardening. The volunteers are not social workers, doctors or any other health care professional. They are just regular people that want to help and touch base with older adults.  The only information that will be shared is a first name and a phone number. Seniors can also pick the best time for volunteers to call.

SCOA will be a central intake agency to provide callers with referrals and support relating to COVID-19.  If the senior is experiencing isolation they would be connected to friendly volunteers that would be a “telephone buddy” .

To register phone SCOA 306.652.2255 

Funded by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program
In partnership with United Way of Saskatoon and Area.

Background: 

The Saskatoon Council on Aging [SCOA] serves the approximately 80,000 older adults 55 and over in Saskatoon and area. The coronavirus outbreak has profoundly impacted the lives of older adults. They are at a high risk to become socially isolated due to necessary social distancing measures designed to keep them safe.

Prior to the crisis, SCOA provided many opportunities for older adults to socialize and stay connected. We presently have a membership of 4500 older adults. We keep people informed through our one stop information and resource centre, caregiver information and support centre, newsletters, directory of services for older adults, spotlight on Seniors trade show and our websites.  Our programs and services including seniors neighborhood hub clubs, century club, life- long learning programs and globe walk program keep older adults socially connected, engaged, active and healthy.

 

 

 

age-friendly, Events, fundraising

Grand Old Opry Zoomer Style – Meet Joseph Klyne

klynne
Joseph Klyne

A professional guitarist by the age of 17, Joseph Klyne has had a successful music career for over 40 years. He first made his living playing lead guitar with various rock cover bands in Winnipeg Manitoba circa 1960. Joseph then developed his own “single” act in Edmonton in the early 70’s. In 1977 he moved to Saskatoon. In the mid 80’s his two sons joined and both took their turn playing bass and harmonizing to his exceptional singing and guitar playing. The J.R. Klyne duo performed throughout Saskatchewan into the early 90’s. Joseph’s guitar style is greatly inspired by Chet Atkins.

Grand Old Opry “Zoomer Style”
October 21, 2020
Western Development Museum
Enjoy a gala evening of country and western music presented by a talented roster of seasoned performers.
Doors open 5 pm Cash Bar
Supper 6 pm,  Entertainment 7:30  pm
Tickets: $100 [tax receipts issued $65]

Phone 306.652.2255 pay with credit card
Buy online at Eventbrite
Visit our office in the field house – 2020 College Drive

A fundraiser for the Saskatoon Council on Aging to provide health and wellness programs for older adults.

age-friendly, Events, fundraising

Grand Old Opry Zoomer Style – Meet the Paddlewheelers

paddlewheelers
Paddlewheelers

Wayne Salloum, Maurice Postnikoff and Doug Porteous came together fifteen years ago for a one time performance.  One thing led to another and the Paddlewheelers were born, a trio who have provided great entertainment in and around Saskatoon and Saskatchewan. Over time the Paddlewheelers added guitarist Evert Van Olst, base guitarist Jonathan Moore-Wright, and percussionist Brent Burlingham. Through guitar, voice, percussion and harp (harmonica) they have a great sound, breaking bread with the audience focusing on music of days gone by. The Paddlewheelers are truly grass roots Saskatchewan.

Grand Old Opry “Zoomer Style”
October 21, 2020
Western Development Museum
Enjoy a gala evening of country and western music presented by a talented roster of seasoned performers.
Doors open 5 pm Cash Bar
Supper 6 pm,  Entertainment 7:30  pm
Tickets: $100 [tax receipts issued $65]

Phone 306.652.2255 pay with credit card
Buy online at Eventbrite
Visit our office in the field house – 2020 College Drive

A fundraiser for the Saskatoon Council on Aging to provide health and wellness programs for older adults.

age-friendly, Events, fundraising

Grand Old Opry Zoomer Style – Meet shuboy

shuboy
Shuboy

Shuboy is an old school street musician based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan . An accomplished performer on the slide guitar and a skilled harp player, he can be found performing originals and covers on his National Steel tricone resonator, homemade cigarbox guitars and harp at summer festivals and fringes across Canada .. and of course, all the best sidewalks. Finding inspiration on the streets, shuboy is fearless when it comes to mixing genres. Injecting his blues into country, bluegrass, jazz, rap, everything in between. Successfully completing his Western 2019 “shuboy’s Traveling Medicine Show” tour, he is planning Eastern Traveling Medicine Showtour in 2020.

Grand Old Opry “Zoomer Style”
October 21, 2020
Western Development Museum
Enjoy a gala evening of country and western music presented by a talented roster of seasoned performers.
Doors open 5 pm Cash Bar
Supper 6 pm,  Entertainment 7:30  pm
Tickets: $100 [tax receipts issued $65]

Phone 306.652.2255 pay with credit card
Buy online at Eventbrite
Visit our office in the field house – 2020 College Drive

A fundraiser for the Saskatoon Council on Aging to provide health and wellness programs for older adults.

age-friendly, Awards, Events

City Receives Age-friendly award

Dr. Murray Scharf accepted the Age-friendly award on behalf of the City of Saskatoon.

murray_blog.jpg

The City of Saskatoon is honored to accept the Age-Friendly Recognition Award from the Province of Saskatchewan, an award that recognizes success and encourages communities to take sustainable action towards becoming Age-friendly. We commend and thank the Saskatoon Council on Aging (SCOA) for its part in earning this award for the City of Saskatoon

The work that brought this about was a project called the Age-Friendly Saskatoon Initiative that was originated and led by the Saskatoon Council on Aging and aimed at community change intended to establish Saskatoon as an age-friendly city. The City was pleased to cooperate with the project and to implement some of its outcomes.

With the growing population of seniors, the City of Saskatoon recognizes the key role it plays in helping to establish clear policy directions for the programs and services required by older adult citizens.

As the provider of many programs, services and infrastructure for the residents

of Saskatoon, the City works to ensure these structures are responsive to the needs of the residents. Fundamental to creating an age-friendly community is a shift in people’s attitude toward a more positive view of aging and older adults. Enabling older adults to engage in social and community activities helps maintain their connections to other people and the community; all of which contribute to an improved overall quality of life.

A commitment to respect and to include older adults is a true measure of a society’s support for the quality of life and social well-being of all of its citizens. To demonstrate the City’s commitment to this great community work, the City of Saskatoon’s Strategic Plan, 2013 – 2023, under the Strategic Goal of Quality of Life, identified as a priority, “the development of age-friendly initiatives to enhance quality of life as people age”.

The Age-friendly Saskatoon Initiative achieved a significant level of success in its efforts to positively change community conversations about an aging population in Saskatoon. This was largely due to the enthusiasm and expertise that older adult volunteers provided and the thousands of hours that they dedicated over the 5 years of the Initiative to ensure the attainment of the project goals. In 2017, following the completion of the Initiative, the City of Saskatoon applied for and was granted full membership in the WHO Global Age-friendly Cities Network.

We look forward to continuing our collaboration with the Saskatoon Council on Aging                   to make Saskatoon a truly age-friendly city. Thank you once again for this award.

trio_blog